Quick Tips: Easy, Breezy

The best fan can’t ventilate a bathroom if fresh air can’t get in to replace the air that is exhausted. In my rig, with the window closed because of weather, the only entry was under the door and the fan just whirled away while moving little of the air.

To improve airflow, I cut a hole in the lower part of the door and attached return air grilles purchased from a home improvement store to each side. My door is hollow, with thin veneer over a wood frame. I was able to make neat cuts with several strokes of a box knife. 

First make a smaller exploratory hole to determine the construction of your door, and the grille size you should use. I chose nominal 12-inch grilles that are actually 133⁄4-by-133⁄4-inch overall, with 111⁄2-by-111⁄2-inch openings. Be sure the openings on both sides of the door are exactly opposite each other. 

Glue wood spacers inside around the edges for reinforcement and to provide backing for the grille screws. Use screws short enough so that they won’t touch. For privacy, install the grilles with the louvers angled down on both sides of the door.

Now, with a vent open elsewhere in the RV, my bathroom stays fog free. The furnace does a better job of heating it, too.

— Jim Andersen | Amity, Ore.


We Want to Hear From You!

Quick Tips, MotorHome’s monthly column of useful, handy and simple tips by fellow RVers, is looking for submissions. Please send your favorite do-it-yourself ideas to: MotorHome Quick Tips, 2575 Vista Del Mar Drive, Ventura, CA 93001, or email [email protected]. Be sure to include any photos, illustrations or drawings, if necessary.

If your tip is selected for publication, you’ll receive $35.

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