Splatter-free Surface … Pronto

 

ProSol Bugs N All makes easy work of removing dried insects from painted surfaces and windows

Keeping bugs off the front of a motorhome is an endless battle. It’s best to remove the bugs before they dry and harden, so most owners judiciously clean the splatter before leaving the RV park. The process is relentless; welcome to life on the road. In an effort to make bug cleaning palatable, if that’s even possible, I discovered a product that actually uses enzymes to dissolve bug carcasses, taking a lot of the elbow grease out of the process. Called ProSol Bugs N All, this spray-on/wipe-off solution could change your attitude about bugs, especially if you’re a fanatic about keeping your motorhome clean.

Special enzymes break down the bugs as long as the surface remains coated with the cleaner. A finger is used to determine when the splatter is released from the surface.
Special enzymes break down the bugs as long as the surface remains coated with the cleaner. A finger is used to determine when the splatter is released from the surface.

Bugs N All is actually more than just an insect remover; it’s a versatile cleaner that will also remove black streaks, road crud and diesel soot — without damaging paint or removing wax. While I “concentrated” on the bug-cleaning capabilities of this product, it’s good to have a multipurpose waterless cleaner on hand, especially if you live in or travel to areas plagued by drought.

To test this product, a well-coated, bug-encrusted front end was allowed to dry for a month. Under these circumstances, the bugs will dry hard as a rock and strain most owners’ patience when cleaning. The key to using Bugs N All is to allow the solution to remain on the surface for 30 seconds or so (up to two minutes for really tough splatter and black streaks) in a cool, shaded area. We found that the splatter began releasing from the surface in less than 30 seconds; once the bugs can be smushed around with a finger, the surface is ready for wiping.

A wet microfiber cloth works best for removing the cleaner, followed by wiping with a dry cloth.
A wet microfiber cloth works best for removing the cleaner, followed by wiping with a dry cloth.

The secret to making this stuff work is keeping the surface wet with the solution while it does its magic. Since we’re dealing with a vertical surface, it’s necessary to reapply the solution because it runs toward the ground. That’s why it’s important not to work in the sun and/or on a hot surface. Some of this can be mitigated by using a garden sprayer, which provides a finer spray, allowing the solution to “stick” better. A concentrated version that can be mixed with water is available and is much more economical than the 32-ounce, ready-to-use product.

Although the company provides tips on how to best apply and remove the solution, I settled on a routine that worked well after experimenting with a few applications. The solution was sprayed on a manageable-size area and allowed to dissolve the bugs. Then I used a damp (almost wet) microfiber cloth to wipe off the dirt and bugs, followed by drying and buffing with another microfiber towel to eliminate any possible streaking. In a few places, a second dose of cleaner was needed to release stubborn splatter. Overall, the cleaner worked like a champ, without much effort. Be prepared to use quite a bit of cleaner, so the case for buying the concentrated product becomes even stronger.

Bugs N All is starting to show up in retail stores, but it’s easiest to order online. A 32-ounce, ready-to-use spray bottle sells for $9.95; a gallon of the concentrate is $44.95.

With Bugs N All in my cleaning arsenal, I no longer snarl at each bug that sacrifices itself on my front cap and windshield.

ProCelle | 866-464-6659 | www.procelle.com


 

 

 

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