Drivers Running on Empty

The number of Texans running out of gas on the highway skyrocketed 53
percent in the first five months of 2008 compared to the same time last
year, according to the Allstate Motor Club. From January through May of
2008, Texans called the Motor Club for fuel delivery 506 times. Allstate
Motor Club set a Texas record in May with 140 out-of-gas calls across
the state.

“We can’t directly correlate this rise in the number of people
running out of gas to the rise in prices at the pump, but we know that
consumers are trying hard to stretch their dollar and sometimes that
means stretching fuel into fumes,” said Evelyn Murphy, an Allstate
Exclusive Agent in Austin. “Drivers should remember running out of gas
on the highway can be a lot more than an inconvenience, it can be
hazardous.”

Murphy says the average wait time for a can of fuel can be 20
or 30 minutes, but more troublesome than the hassle is the danger of
being stuck on the road. According to the roadside assistance experts at
Allstate Motor Club, running out of gas increases the risk of much more
serious accidents for the driver with an empty tank and other motorists
who suddenly have to maneuver around a disabled vehicle.

React safely. If you find yourself out of fuel, Allstate Motor Club recommends remembering your safety first.

 

1. If you feel your engine
running out of fuel, get off the road. Pulling your coach to the curb will help you, your
passengers and your vehicle from becoming a traffic hazard.

 

2. If you run out of gas in
traffic, stay in your vehicle until you are absolutely certain it is safe to get out.

 

3.
Call for help after you and your passengers are in a secure location. If you do not have a
motor club membership, many states and municipalities have emergency roadside assistance
services that may help get you and your coach out of danger.

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