Kodachrome Basin State Park

early evening

Donna Ikenberry
June 15, 2013

Mention Utah and most people think of destinations like Bryce Canyon and Zion national parks. No doubt these places are worth a visit, but there’s also a brilliant treasure to the east of those well-known attractions, a 2,241-acre gem named Kodachrome Basin State Park. There are plenty of things to... Read more »

A Day in San Diego: Gorgeous Golfing, Fantastic Fish Tacos

Gliders hover over the cliffs off the legendary Torrey Pines golf course.

May 14, 2013

San Diego is a fantastic destination for anyone looking for a taste of that legendary laid-back SoCal culture.  Bring your clubs and some sandals, no reason to stay inside the RV with weather like this! Golfers have probably seen the elegant Torrey Pines golf course atop a magazine list or a best course... Read more »

Sweetwater County, 
Wyoming: How Sweet It Is

_MG_4459

Bobbie Hasselbring
May 14, 2013

The stallion turns and looks straight at us, ears perked, nostrils flaring, smelling our presence. One of about 250 mustangs in Wyoming’s White Mountain Wild Horse Herd, he stands about 100 yards off the road and, as I sit in my motorhome peering through my spotting scope, my heart races. He is all... Read more »

Taking the High Road to Taos

Gorge Bridge

David Barber
May 3, 2013

  Northern New Mexico is a beloved destination. In addition to the high desert landscape, it has a unique cultural history. Unlike much of the United States, the first settlers (after the indigenous peoples) were the Spanish, who came north from Mexico in 1540, 80 years before the English colonists... Read more »

A Day In Little Rock: World Class BBQ and Southern Shopping

7-Rivermarket

Nicholas Upton, Digital Editor
April 16, 2013

Little Rock, Ark., is like many medium-size cities that dot the southern states. But the mix of Victorian history and modernity takes on a buzz of activity due to the Arkansas State Capitol. The city takes great care to draw visitors and keep them entertained in various ways — and hey, it’s... Read more »

The Spirit of the West

The Buffalo Bill Historical Center

David Barber
March 27, 2013

The small town of Cody, Wyo., near the eastern entrance to Yellowstone National Park, is home to a remarkable Western history museum, the Buffalo Bill Historical Center, named in honor of the town’s namesake, William F. “Buffalo Bill” Cody. Affiliated with the Smithsonian Institution, the center... Read more »

Exploring Cochise County, Arizona

The Organ Pipe Formation in Chiricahua National Monument

Mary Zalmanek
March 26, 2013

During a recent two-month trip in our motorhome, my husband, Jim, and I joined the migration of snowbirds seeking sunshine and adventure in Arizona. As our sojourn drew to a close, we spent five days in Cochise County, Arizona, exploring natural and historic sights in the southeastern corner of the state. The... Read more »

Historic Beauty in Holyoke

Wistariahurst Museum in Holyoke

Laura Michaels, Managing Editor
March 20, 2013

Bedecked in original leather wall coverings and boasting ornate woodwork, vaulted ceilings and parquet floors, the Wistariahurst Museum in Holyoke, Mass., presents an engaging lesson in the history and culture of the area and the home’s former inhabitants. First built by prominent silk manufacturer... Read more »

Exploring Everglades National Park in Southern Florida

Alligator sunning - Photo: National park service

Christine Goodier
Photos: Robert Goodier
March 19, 2013

I’ll admit it: we watch reality TV shows set in swamps — the ones where gutsy gals and gritty guys search for enormous reptiles. So in a quest to learn more about our country’s wild creatures, my husband, Bob, and I made a detour last spring during our trip to Florida. After leaving the Florida... Read more »

Providence Canyon: Georgia’s “Little Grand Canyon”

Providence Canyon State Park

Laura Michaels, Managing Editor
March 15, 2013

Nicknamed Georgia’s “Little Grand Canyon,” Providence Canyon in Lumpkin is a constantly evolving canvas. Ongoing erosion manipulates the soft Georgia clay, continuing a process that began in the 1800s when poor farming practices resulted in furrows that deepened over several decades into gullies,... Read more »

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